Ten months of temporal variation in the clinical journey of hospitalised patients with COVID-19: an observational cohort

Published
23 Nov 2021
Elife
Authors
ISARIC Clinical Characterisation Group, Hall MD, Baruch J, Carson G, Citarella BW, Dagens A, Dankwa E, Donnelly CA, Dunning J, Escher M, Kartsonaki C, Merson L, Pritchard M, Wei J, Horby PW, Rojek A, Olliaro PL.
DOI

Abstract

Background: There is potentially considerable variation in the nature and duration of the care provided to hospitalised patients during an infectious disease epidemic or pandemic. Improvements in care and clinician confidence may shorten the time spent as an inpatient, or the need for admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) or high density unit (HDU). On the other hand, limited resources at times of high demand may lead to rationing. Nevertheless, these variables may be used as static proxies for disease severity, as outcome measures for trials, and to inform planning and logistics.

 

Methods

We investigate these time trends in an extremely large international cohort of 142,540 patients hospitalised with COVID-19. Investigated are: time from symptom onset to hospital admission, probability of ICU/HDU admission, time from hospital admission to ICU/HDU admission, hospital case fatality ratio (hCFR) and total length of hospital stay.

 

Results

Time from onset to admission showed a rapid decline during the first months of the pandemic followed by peaks during August/September and December 2020. ICU/HDU admission was more frequent from June to August. The hCFR was lowest from June to August. Raw numbers for overall hospital stay showed little variation, but there is clear decline in time to discharge for ICU/HDU survivors.

 

Conclusions

Our results establish that variables of these kinds have limitations when used as outcome measures in a rapidly-evolving situation.