News https://www.iddo.org/news.rss en Highlights from the 9th EDCTP Forum in Lisbon https://www.iddo.org/news/highlights-9th-edctp-forum-lisbon <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Highlights from the 9th EDCTP Forum in Lisbon </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">09 Nov 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Researchers from IDDO and the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) presented at the 9th European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) forum held in Lisbon, Portugal from 17-21 September 2018.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/ninth-edctp-forum_45356231631_o%20-%20facebook.jpg?h=cb1dbbec&amp;itok=1NmwUyWQ" width="600" height="375" alt="Dr Mahamoud Sama Cherif presenting his poster on creating an equitable governance framework for IDDO’s Ebola research theme, credit: EDCTP forum." title="Dr Mahamoud Sama Cherif presenting his poster on creating an equitable governance framework for IDDO’s Ebola research theme, credit: EDCTP forum." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Over 500 delegates attended the 9th EDCTP forum to discuss the impact and opportunities for clinical research and sustainable development partnerships in sub-Saharan Africa.</p> <p>An inspiring workshop led by <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-philippe-guerin">Professor Philippe Guérin</a>, <a href="/ebola/iddo-staff/laura-merson">Laura Merson</a> and Trudie Lang at <a href="https://tghn.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Global Health Network (TGHN)</a>, presented the challenges and opportunities of data sharing. <a href="http://www.wwarn.org/about-us/regional-centres/west-africa-regional-centre" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WWARN’s West African Regional Centre</a> lead <a href="/professor-oumar-gaye">Professor Oumar Gaye</a> shared his perspective of gathering and pooling data for collaborative analyses with multiple partners in the region. The workshop is well timed to support EDCTP as it explores new strategies with programme partners to share and re-use research data more openly. The workshop team launched a new partnership initiative that will provide practical tools and guidance on data sharing. </p> <p>Our Scientific Symposium, ‘Data sharing for global research good’, focused on specific data sharing case studies across multiple infectious and neglected tropical diseases. <a href="https://www.iddo.org/vl/iddo-staff/michael-ochieng-otieno" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Michael Ochieng Otieno</a> at DNDi discussed how IDDO is developing a data-sharing platform for <a href="/research-themes/visceral-leishmaniasis"><span><span>visceral leishmaniasis </span></span>(VL)</a> whilst <a href="https://www.iddo.org/ebola/iddo-staff/dr-mahamoud-sama-cherif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dr Mahamoud Sama Cherif</a>, EDCTP-TDR fellow, explained the key steps taken to create an equitable governance framework for IDDO’s <a href="/research-themes/ebola">Ebola research theme</a>. Michael and Mahamoud were also joined by colleagues at WWARN. <a href="/malaria/iddo-staff/dr-paul-sondo">Dr Paul Sondo</a>, TDR fellow from the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro in Burkina Faso*, presented WWARN’s experience  generating reliable evidence from IPD meta-analyses whilst Senior Scientist <a href="/iddo-staff/dr-elizabeth-allen">Elizabeth Allen</a> presented the latest additions to the <a href="http://www.wwarn.org/tools-resources/malaria-clinical-trials-toolkit" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WWARN Malaria Toolkit</a>.</p> <p><em>*TDR is the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, hosted by the World Health Organization. TDR Fellows spend 12 months working with WWARN and IDDO on special projects.</em></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Fri, 09 Nov 2018 14:13:00 +0000 Bradley 393 at https://www.iddo.org Inspiring new collaboration and discussion on substandard and falsified medicines at MQPH 2018 https://www.iddo.org/news/inspiring-new-collaboration-and-discussion-substandard-and-falsified-medicines-mqph-2018 <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Inspiring new collaboration and discussion on substandard and falsified medicines at MQPH 2018 </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">02 Nov 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Over 200 delegates travelled from more than 50 countries to attend the first ever conference on Medicine Quality and Public Health (MQPH) in Oxford from 23-28 September 2018.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/IMG_20180926_133724.jpg?itok=qfduBdR9" width="600" height="450" alt="Over 200 delegates attended MPQH 2018" title="Over 200 delegates attended MPQH 2018" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p dir="ltr">The conference, co-organised by IDDO, brought together experts from academia, public health, pharmacy, chemistry, law, ethics, social sciences, public engagement, health policy, with national medicines regulatory authorities, NGOs, international organizations and donors. Many conference partners, including the <a href="http://www.who.int/">World Health Organization</a>, <a href="http://www.usp.org/">United States Pharmacopeia (USP)</a>, the Wellcome Trust and the <a href="https://www.conceptfoundation.org/">Concept Foundation</a>, presented the latest evidence on substandard, falsified and unregulated medicines, and discussed strategies to tackle this global challenge.</p> <p dir="ltr">Opening speakers Dr. Suzanne Hill, Director of the Essential Medicines and Health Products Department of the World Health Organization (WHO), Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Ms Agnes Sitta Kijo, Acting Director General of the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA), and Professor Sir Nicholas White, Chairman of the MORU Tropical Health Network, called for collaborative efforts beyond geographic borders and sectoral divisions to more urgently intervene to address the serious public health problem of substandard and falsified medical products.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dr. Hill highlighted how as many as 1 in 10 medicines in low and middle-income countries are estimated to be substandard or falsified, and billions of dollars are wasted on substandard or falsified (SF) medical products every year. Dr Hill called for delegates to develop more research to demonstrate the socio-economic impact and cost of substandard and falsified medical products and explained how this could be used to generate more investment from governments. Michael Deats, Group Lead for Substandard and Falsified Medical Products at WHO, presented the work and results of the Global Surveillance and Monitoring System. A number of talks from experts from the Belgium government, Oxfam and the Nigerian parliament focused on the legal and regulatory opportunities and challenges at a global and national level.</p> <p dir="ltr">It is widely known that antimalarials are the frequent target of criminals, and substandard antimalarials have often been reported in low and middle-income countries. Evidence suggests that sub-therapeutic doses of antimalarials are accelerating the emergence and spread of drug resistant parasites. Professor Lisa White, Head of MAEMOD at MORU/ University of Oxford, described the development of mathematical models to understand how substandard and falsified medicines affect patient outcomes and contribute to <a href="https://www.iddo.org/research-themes/antimicrobial-resistance">antimicrobial resistance (AMR)</a></p> <p dir="ltr">Dr Raffaella Ravinetto, of the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp and scientific advisor at QUAMED, discussed how to optimise medicine quality in supply chains. Raffaella presented examples of loopholes in Asia and Africa that allow substandard and falsified medicines to infiltrate the supply chain in public, private and non-for-profit sectors. Delegates heard a call for more collaboration among stakeholders to optimise the quality of medicines in the supply chain.</p> <p dir="ltr">Across many sessions at the conference, a lack of evidence and the need for better data standardisation were raised as ongoing challenges, especially in low and middle-income settings. To help address this challenge, IDDO &amp; MORU Network presented an interactive mapping system that tabulates and displays publicly available evidence on the quality of essential medicines, starting with antimalarials, anti-retrovirals and antidiabetic medical products. This tool will be made publicly available online soon. Clark Freifeld from Boston Children’s Hospital presented the work he and the IDDO/MORU Network team are conducting, aimed at searching and visualizing information on medicine quality from the lay literature in multiple languages. These tools will give us more understanding on the epidemiology of SF medicines on a global scale and how they change through time and space, and will provide a valuable resource for policy makers and civil society.</p> <p dir="ltr">Participants from many organizations explained how SF medical products negate the benefits of access to modern healthcare, especially for the most vulnerable. Many of the conference partners are key stakeholders for the new <a href="https://medswecantrust.org/">Medicines We Can Trust campaign</a> (#MedsWeCanTrust) launched earlier this year.</p> <p dir="ltr">A short statement from the conference participants, will be released soon, followed by a broader consensus statement outlining the key medicine quality policy and research issues to prioritize going forward. It is expected this statement will be released in Spring 2019, in conjunction with activities coordinated by the <a href="https://medswecantrust.org/">Medicines We Can Trust Campaign</a> (#MedsWeCanTrust).</p> <p dir="ltr">Professor Paul Newton, Director of <a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/lomwru-laos">Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital Wellcome Trust Research Unit (LOMWRU)</a> and Head of the IDDO Medicine Quality Group explained, ‘The conference consensus statement will outline the key opportunities and priority ‘next steps’ to tackle poor quality medicines. We hope to organize many more opportunities to collaborate and make a real difference to the lives of those affected by this unacceptable global health challenge.’</p> <p dir="ltr">A selection of <a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/photos/">conference photos</a> will be uploaded onto the MQPH website shortly </p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/IDDOnews">Follow @IDDOnews</a> to read the conference highlights and search for #MQPH2018 and #MedsWeCanTrust</p> <p dir="ltr">For media enquiries please email Andrea Stewart: andrea.stewart@iddo.org</p> <p dir="ltr">If you’d like to learn more about our work on Medicine Quality, please visit our Medicine Quality programme or email info [at] iddo [dot] org.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Fri, 02 Nov 2018 14:18:35 +0000 paula.feery@iddo.org 382 at https://www.iddo.org Ebola Data Access Committee call for nominations https://www.iddo.org/news/ebola-data-access-committee-call-nominations <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Ebola Data Access Committee call for nominations </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">01 Nov 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p dir="ltr"><span>IDDO’s Ebola Data Platform, a pioneering collaboration in Ebola and emerging infections, has opened nominations for members of its Data Access Committee (DAC). Individuals with skills and expertise in clinical research, data protection and management, ethics in research and emergency public health response, benefit sharing and community engagement are invited to apply. </span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/Ebola-PPE-Credit-DFID.jpg?h=182adfe8&amp;itok=sBP_1N8k" width="600" height="375" alt="Scientist in protective clothing" title="Ebola personal protective equipment. Credit: DFID" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p dir="ltr"><span>The</span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/research-themes/ebola"> </a><span><a href="/research-themes/ebola">Platform</a> has been established to develop and promote research on Ebola. The platform aims to aggregate and standardise clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data and make it available to researchers.  </span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The DAC will be a key pillar of the platform’s governance framework. It is an independent committee that will support the development, implementation and evolution of the Data Access Guidelines in line with the platform mission set out in the <a href="/document/ebola-charter">Charter</a>.</span><span> </span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Nominations should be sent to </span><span><a href="mailto:EbolaDAC@iddo.org">EbolaDAC@iddo.org</a> by 23 November 2018 and include the nominee’s name, current position, contact information and a brief description of suitability. </span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><strong>About The DAC</strong></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The Ebola Data Platform will consider applications to access data on the platform and decide if they are in line with the </span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/ebola/research-agenda">Research Agenda</a><span>, Data Access Guidelines, the </span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/document/ebola-ethics-framework">Ethics Framework</a><span> and the </span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/document/ebola-conflict-interest-policy">Conflict of Interest Policy</a><span> and respond accordingly to applicants. </span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The DAC will additionally agree the data to be released and provide regular input to the Steering Committee on the definition of research priorities, emerging issues in data access and any implications for platform strategy and policy. The DAC is chaired by the Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases Research (TDR). </span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Find out more about our work on Ebola <a href="/research-themes/ebola">here</a>.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p> </p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Thu, 01 Nov 2018 14:05:59 +0000 Bradley 376 at https://www.iddo.org ASTMH 2018 is starting soon – find out more about our activities in New Orleans https://www.iddo.org/news/astmh-2018-starting-soon-find-out-more-about-our-activities-new-orleans <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> ASTMH 2018 is starting soon – find out more about our activities in New Orleans </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">25 Oct 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p dir="ltr"><span>If you’re planning to be at this year’s 67</span><span>th</span><span> American Society of Tropical Medicine and Health Annual Meeting in New Orleans, then do come and see us. We’ll be sharing our latest results and tools at </span><strong>Booth 416 </strong><span>– so do stop by to meet the </span><span>IDDO team</span><span> to exchange ideas on how we might work together. </span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/ASTMH-2017-CCVTM-WWARN-stand_0.jpg?h=3d0c36e5&amp;itok=g7vC5-Tq" width="600" height="375" alt="IDDO stand at ASTMH" title="IDDO stand at ASTMH" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span>We are using the </span><strong>St Charles Room for meetings on the 41</strong><strong>st</strong><strong> Floor</strong><span> of the Marriot hotel. We would be delighted to arrange a side meeting with you during the conference – please let us know if you would like to meet by emailing: </span><a href="mailto:philippe.guerin@iddo.org"><span>philippe.guerin@iddo.org</span></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>If you can’t attend this year’s meeting, then follow us on Twitter </span><a href="https://twitter.com/?lang=en-gb"><strong>@IDDOnews</strong></a><span>. We’re also supporting the #tropmed18 conference Twitter feed.</span><strong> </strong></p> <h3 dir="ltr"><strong>Here’s some of the oral sessions involving IDDO and our partners below – </strong><a href="http://www.wwarn.org/sites/default/files/uploads/iddo_wwarn_sessions_at_astmh_2018_0.pdf"><u>download the full schedule</u></a> <strong>of presentations and posters.</strong></h3> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>MONDAY 29 October 2018 </strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>10:15-10:30 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/dr-georgina-humphreys">Dr Georgina Humphreys</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Spatiotemporal modelling of prevalence of </span><em>Plasmodium falciparum</em><span> drug resistance mutations in the </span><em>dhps</em><span> gene across Africa, 1990 – 2015.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>11:15-11:30 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-joel-tarning">Prof Joel Tarning</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in seasonal malaria chemoprevention in young children.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>12:00-13:45 Poster 573 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/brittany-maguire">Brittany Maguire</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The Chagas disease study landscape: Preliminary analysis of a systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies to assess the feasibility of establishing an individual participant-level data (IPD) platform.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>17:00-17:15 – Poojan Shrestha with </strong><strong>Co-chairs - <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-philippe-guerin">Profs Philippe Guérin</a> and <a href="https://www.iddo.org/mq/iddo-staff/professor-paul-newton">Paul Newton</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Non-malaria fever revealed - Insights from South and Southeast Asia.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER 2018</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>10:30-10:45 – Session 69 - <a href="https://www.iddo.org/ebola/iddo-staff/laura-merson">Laura Merson</a> (on behalf of <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/dr-mehul-dhorda">Dr Mehul Dhorda</a>) </strong><span>Speaker 1 against the motion</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Debate: Secondary Data Users Should Pay to Access Individual Level Research Data.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>11:30-12:00 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-joel-tarning">Prof Joel Tarning</a>, Co-Chair</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of Triple ACTs.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>12:00-13:45 - Poster 801 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/ebola/iddo-staff/dr-mahamoud-sama-cherif">Dr Mahamoud Sama Cherif</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The Ebola Data Platform: a novel collaboration for training and research in emerging infections.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>16:15-16:30 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/vl/iddo-staff/prabin-dahal">Dr Prabin Dahal</a>, Co-Chair</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Simulation studies to quantify the impact of competing risk events in a hypothetical scenario of falling antimalarial drug efficacy in single-armed and comparative drug trials.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>WEDNESDAY 31 OCTOBER 2018</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>12:00-13:45 - Poster 1521 – Dr Amélie Julé</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>A Qualitative Study of Barriers and Enablers to the Establishment of Robust Clinical Research Data Management Systems in Low and Middle Income Countries.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>14:15-14:30 – <a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-ric-price">Prof Ric Price</a></strong></p> <p><span>Economic costs of </span><em>P. vivax</em><span> episodes: a multi-country comparative analysis using primary trial data.</span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Thu, 25 Oct 2018 11:57:04 +0000 Anonymous 373 at https://www.iddo.org First ever international conference on Medicine Quality and Public Health starts soon in Oxford https://www.iddo.org/news/first-ever-international-conference-medicine-quality-and-public-health-starts-soon-oxford <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> First ever international conference on Medicine Quality and Public Health starts soon in Oxford </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">21 Sep 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>The <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/">Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO)</a></span>, together with many partners including the <span><a href="http://www.usp.org/">United States Pharmacopeia (USP)</a></span>, the <span><a href="https://www.conceptfoundation.org/">Concept Foundation</a></span>, the <span><a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/home">Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU)</a></span> and the Wellcome Trust will host the first Medicine Quality and Public Health conference at Keble College, Oxford, 23-28 September 2018.  </span></span></span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/DieoeNJXcAAOX1D.jpg?h=0f5c944d&amp;itok=GKXlfXnW" width="600" height="375" alt="MQPH 2018 conference" title="MQPH 2018 conference" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>Close to 200 experts from around 50 countries will attend the conference to <a href="/news/experts-seek-consensus-tackling-poor-quality-medicines"><span>discuss strategies and exchange ideas for tackling the proliferation of poor quality medicines and medical products</span></a>. This important, but often neglected public health problem, threatens the lives of millions both in low-and-middle-income and high-income countries. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The conference aims to strengthen partnerships across different sectors from academia, public health, pharmacy and chemistry to law and ethics. A consensus statement, coordinated by <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/mq/iddo-staff/professor-paul-newton">Professor Paul Newton</a></span>, based at the <span><a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/lomwru-laos">Lao-Oxford-Mahosot Hospital Wellcome Trust Research Unit (LOMWRU)</a></span> will be discussed at the end of the conference. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Professor Paul Newton explains, ‘<em>The statement will outline the key opportunities and suggested ‘next steps’ to tackle medicine quality challenges. The conference provides us with an excellent opportunity to foster closer collaboration and international coordination on matters relating to medicine quality</em>.’</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Dr Suzanne Hill, Director of the Essential Medicines and Health Products Department of the World Health Organization (WHO) will be joined by opening speaker Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Agnes Sitta Kijo, Acting Director General of the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA), Professor Mojisola Christianah Adeyeye, Director General of the Nigerian National Agency for Food &amp; Drug Administration and Control (NFDA) and <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/professor-sir-nicholas-white-frs">Professor Sir Nicholas White</a></span>, Chairman of the Wellcome Trust Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Dr Raffaella Ravinetto, senior researcher at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp and scientific advisor at QUAMED, will chair the first conference session on preventing, detecting and responding to poor quality medicines. Michael Deats, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) group lead for Substandard and Falsified Medical Products, will provide an overview of poor quality medicine, including the causes, consequences and WHO’s role in addressing the challenges. In the afternoon, Professor Sir Nicholas White will chair a session reviewing the latest evidence on the contribution of poor quality medicines to increasing <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/research-themes/antimicrobial-resistance">antimicrobial resistance (AMR)</a></span>. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>There will be a number of short talks throughout the conference on a range of medicine quality topics including: challenges and detection of falsified medicines in developing countries delivered by Dr Richard Jähnke, project manager of the Global Pharma Health Fund on the morning of Tuesday 25 September.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>On Tuesday 25 September, delegates will learn about the economics and policy influencing medicine quality at a session chaired by Fiona Theunissen, programme manager at the Concept Foundation in Geneva.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>IDDO will lead a number of sessions at the conference including a discussion on the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of current technologies to screen for poor quality medicines on the morning of Tuesday 25 September. <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-philippe-guerin">Professor Philippe Guérin</a></span>, Director of IDDO, will co-chair with <span><a href="https://www.iddo.org/mq/iddo-staff/dr-celine-caillet">Dr Céline Caillet</a></span>, IDDO’s Medicine Quality Research Scientist. The session will share findings of an IDDO-MORU systematic review, <a href="https://gh.bmj.com/content/3/4/e000725" target="_blank"><span>published in the BMJ Global Health journal</span></a> that evaluated screening technologies for poor quality medicines. In the afternoon IDDO will host a session optimising survey techniques and data sharing to help tackle poor quality, substandard and falsified medicines.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>On Wednesday 26 September, delegates will attend talks on the ethics, corruption and public trust related to medicine quality. Experts from the pharmaceutical industry, legal, and financial sectors will lead discussions on Thursday 27 September – sharing perspectives on how to strengthen medicine regulation in different economic and political contexts. Dr Souly Phanouvong, Director of Global Public Health Asia at USP, will chair a session on the pre-qualification of medical products on the Thursday afternoon.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The conference will conclude, Friday 28 September with talks from Marie Lamy, Director of Access and Policy at APLMA, discussing the problem of falsified and substandard antimalarial medicines in the Greater Mekong Subregion and policy-making in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. Marie Lamy will be joined by Dr Katherine Bond, Vice President of International Public Policy and Regulatory Affairs at USP, who will talk about USP’s <span><a href="https://medswecantrust.org/">‘Medicines We Can Trust’ campaign</a></span>, promoting safe, quality medicine for all. IDDO alongside partners’ the <span><a href="http://www.wwarn.org/">Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN)</a></span> are supporters and members of the campaign. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><a href="https://twitter.com/IDDOnews">Follow <strong>@IDDOnews</strong></a></span> to read the conference highlights and tweet using <strong>#MQPH2018 </strong>and #MedsWeCanTrust</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>For delegate information please <span><a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/generalinformation/">visit this page</a></span> and full programme details can be found in the <span><a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/MQPH-2018-Conference-Brochure.pdf">conference brochure</a></span>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>For media enquiries please e-mail Andrea Stewart: <span>andrea.stewart@iddo.org</span>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>If you’re not attending the conference, but would like to learn more about our work on Medicine Quality, please visit <span><a href="mailto:our%20Medicine%20Quality%20page">our Medicine Quality page</a></span> or <span><a href="mailto:e-mail%20info@iddo.org">e-mail info@iddo.org</a></span>.</span></span></span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Sep 2018 14:51:42 +0000 Bradley 363 at https://www.iddo.org 9th EDCTP Forum starts this week https://www.iddo.org/news/9th-edctp-forum-starts-week <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> 9th EDCTP Forum starts this week </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">18 Sep 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>We are delighted to attend the 9th EDCTP Forum in Lisbon, Portugal this week.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/IMG-20180918-WA0003.jpg?itok=AIfCoY7E" width="600" height="450" alt="Sama Cherif presenting at ‘Data-sharing for global research good’ symposium" title="Sama Cherif presenting at ‘Data-sharing for global research good’ symposium" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Our first Scientific Symposium, in partnership is on <strong>Tuesday 18th September at 10.30am</strong> on the theme <em>‘Data-sharing for global research good’</em>.</p> <p><a href="/vl/iddo-staff/michael-ochieng-otieno">Michael Ochieng Otieno</a>, EDCTP-TDR Fellow, will present his experience of developing a <a href="/research-themes/visceral-leishmaniasis">data-sharing platform for visceral leishmaniasis (VL)</a> from DNDi.</p> <p><a href="https://www.iddo.org/malaria/iddo-staff/dr-paul-sondo">Paul Sondo</a> will discuss how the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) has generated reliable research evidence by analysing antimalarial drug resistance research data on the <a href="https://www.iddo.org/research-themes/malaria">malaria platform</a>.</p> <p>Sama Cherif will discuss establishing equitable governance for the launch of the <a href="/research-themes/ebola">Ebola data platform</a>.  </p> <p>Elizabeth Allen, Senior Scientist at WWARN's Southern Africa hub, will present on WWARN's Clinical Trials Toolkit.</p> <p>This symposium will be held in Auditorium 2.</p> <p><strong>On Thursday 20th September at 14:30</strong>, <a href="/malaria/iddo-staff/professor-philippe-guerin">Philippe Guérin</a> will join <a href="/ebola/iddo-staff/laura-merson">Laura Merson</a>, <a href="/professor-oumar-gaye">Oumar Gaye</a> and colleagues from <a href="https://tghn.org/" target="_blank">The Global Health Network (TGHN) </a>to present a <em>‘Data-sharing workshop’</em> that will include a presentation of IDDO’s experience of gathering and analysing data for emerging infections and infectious diseases including malaria, Ebola, VL and schistosomiasis.</p> <p>Philippe Guérin and Laura Merson will focus on the research, management and ethical implications of sharing data globally.</p> <p>Oumar Gaye will present his experience of leading research collaborations in our <a href="http://www.wwarn.org/about-us/regional-centres/west-africa-regional-centre" target="_blank">West Africa Regional Centre</a>, primarily focussed on malaria drug resistance data-sharing under the auspices of WWARN.</p> <p>This workshop will be held in Auditorium 3.</p> <p>Sama Cherif will present a poster on '<strong><em>Establishing an equitable governance framework for an Ebola data-sharing platform' poster 8522.</em></strong></p> <p>We’ll be sharing news from the conference via Twitter – <a href="https://twitter.com/IDDOnews" target="_blank">follow @IDDOnews</a> to read the conference highlights.</p> <p><a href="http://www.edctpforum2018.org/" target="_blank">Visit the EDCTP Forum website</a>.</p> <p>If you’re not going to EDCTP, we hope to see you at ASTMH 2018 in New Orleans, USA. Let us know if you’re attending as we’d like to connect. Email <a href="mailto:info@iddo.org">info@iddo.org</a></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Tue, 18 Sep 2018 09:27:22 +0000 Bradley 362 at https://www.iddo.org Study details high hidden economic costs of antibiotic consumption https://www.iddo.org/news/study-details-high-hidden-economic-costs-antibiotic-consumption <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Study details high hidden economic costs of antibiotic consumption </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">22 Aug 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Bangkok / Oxford, 22 August 2018 – The economic costs of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) for every course of antibiotics are considerable, and much higher than their purchase cost, say researchers.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/C0142715_lo.jpg?itok=fcnpM-HW" width="600" height="400" alt="The economic costs of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are higher than the sales price of most popular antibiotics, according to a recent MORU/IDDO study. Curbing the unnecessary use of antibiotics is key to dealing with the AMR issue head on, particularly in SE Asia, which has the highest rates of AMR and a big, informal medicine dispensing sector that aggravates the AMR problem. ©2018 MORU/Wellcome." title="The economic costs of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are higher than the sales price of most popular antibiotics, according to a recent MORU/IDDO study. Curbing the unnecessary use of antibiotics is key to dealing with the AMR issue head on, particularly in SE Asia, which has the highest rates of AMR and a big, informal medicine dispensing sector that aggravates the AMR problem. ©2018 MORU/Wellcome." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span>In a </span></span><span><u><span><a href="http://bit.ly/2OZ1MiL">landmark study</a></span></u></span><span><span>, a team of researchers led by the Mahidol Oxford Research Centre (MORU) and the </span></span><span><u><span><a href="http://www.iddo.org">Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO)</a></span></u></span><span><span> used data from the USA and Thailand to link the consumption of antibiotics with the direct and indirect costs of treating patients for five drug-resistant bacterial infections.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>In a first, the experts looked at the consequences of antibiotic treatment failure –  higher death rates, lost earnings, more expensive diagnostics, costs to care providers and health systems – to calculate in USD the cost of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) for five types of antibiotic drugs widely used in the USA, a high-income country (HIC),  and in Thailand, a lower-middle income country (LMIC).</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These estimates will help us to better understand the true costs of AMR associated with antibiotic consumption. They provide policy makers and health carers with data they can use to decide on how best to deploy their limited resources to fight drug-resistant infections,” says first author, </span></span>Poojan Shrestha, researcher at the <span><u><a href="http://www.iddo.org">IDDO</a></u></span>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>The study found that in the US, a full course of amoxicillin, which costs under USD10, had an additional AMR cost of US$18.60. In Thailand, a full course of widely used amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, which can be purchased for under USD2 over the counter in most pharmacies, had an estimated AMR cost of USD10.40. Multiplying each drug’s AMR costs by the number of treatment doses would allow health authorities to make better, more informed treatment decisions, the authors say.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>These figures will allow us to make more evidence-based health care decisions – and consider alternatives such as low-cost rapid diagnostic tests to confirm bacterial infection, a measure which could help reduce antibiotic consumption and slow the spread of drug-resistant infections,” said Prof. <span><u><a href="mailto:http://www.tropmedres.ac/researchers/researcher/yoel-lubell">Yoel Lubell</a></u></span>, lead author and Senior Health Economist at <span><u><a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/home">MORU</a></u></span>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Each year, an estimated 700,000 people around the world die of drug resistant infections, with one report estimating that this will rise to 10 million people a year unless proactive solutions are found to slow the rise of AMR infections.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This study is an important first attempt to produce a menu of estimates for the costs of AMR and provides a useful benchmark by comparing two locations and contrasting settings: the USA, which has a relatively low AMR burden, and Thailand, which has much higher consumption and drug resistance rates for antibiotics,” says Prof Philippe Guerin, co-author and Director of <span><u><a href="http://www.iddo.org">IDDO</a></u></span>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“Generating strong estimates of the costs associated with antimicrobial resistance is very difficult, but is a challenge that we must attempt to overcome if we are to make the best use of the resources available and fight drug resistance,” explains Prof Joanna Coast, researcher at the School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Noting that their assumptions are conservative and likely underestimate the full economic costs of AMR per antibiotic consumed, the study authors suggest that further studies are urgently needed.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“We have to start dealing with the AMR issue head on, and curbing the unnecessary use of antibiotics is key. We are keen to develop further studies across SE Asia, where we find the highest rates of AMR. Many SE Asian countries have little regulation of antibiotics and a big, informal medicine dispensing sector that aggravates the AMR problem. The study findings can help identify cost-effective interventions to fight AMR. Failing to act now puts the lives of millions at risk as treatment failures become increasingly widespread,” said Prof. Lubell. </span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><span><span><span>Notes: </span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><u><em><a href="https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-018-0384-3">Enumerating the economic cost of antimicrobial resistance per antibiotic consumed to inform the evaluation of interventions affecting their use.</a></em></u></span><em> </em>Shrestha P, Cooper BS, Coast J, Oppong R, Do Thi Thuy NDT, Phodha T, Celhay O, Guerin PJ, Wertheim H, Lubell Y. <span><u><span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Enumerating+the+economic+cost+of+antimicrobial+resistance+per+antibiotic+consumed+to+inform+the+evaluation+of+interventions+affecting+their+use." title="Antimicrobial resistance and infection control."><span>Antimicrob Resist Infect Control.</span></a></span></u></span> <span>2018 Aug 9;7:98. doi: 10.1186/s13756-018-0384-3. eCollection 2018.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Use this web-based application to calculate the economic cost of AMR for other countries: <span><u><a href="https://moru.shinyapps.io/amrcost/">https://moru.shinyapps.io/amrcost/</a></u></span> .</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>This web-based application can be used to calculate the economic cost of AMR in different countries. The user can use the default values provided or choose to customise the input parameters (e.g. for a different country, given the availability of data) to generate a menu of costs of AMR.</span></span></span></p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Wed, 22 Aug 2018 15:16:10 +0000 bradley.smith 357 at https://www.iddo.org Applications Open for Global Health Journalism Fellowship https://www.iddo.org/news/applications-open-global-health-journalism-fellowship <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Applications Open for Global Health Journalism Fellowship </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">03 Aug 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The 2018 Global Health Journalism Fellowship will invite outstanding young journalists to participate in the first ever international conference on <a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Medicine Quality and Public Health</a> at the University of Oxford. Application deadline is 12 August 2018</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/journalism%20fellowship%201.jpg?itok=yyEJ-9In" width="600" height="400" alt="Credit: iStock" title="Credit: iStock" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The proliferation of poor quality medical products (medicines, vaccines and devices) is an important but neglected public health problem, threatening millions of lives in developing and developed countries. Accurate journalistic reporting is essential to ensure that the public are aware of the dangers of falsified and substandard medicines but are not discouraged from taking appropriate medicines and seeking medical advice. </p> <p>Therefore, the 2018 Global Health Journalism Fellowship will invite outstanding young journalists to participate in the first ever international conference on <a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Medicine Quality and Public Health</a> at the University of Oxford, from 23-28 September.</p> <p>This conference will bring together over 200 stakeholders from academia, NGOs, private sector organisations and policy-makers to discuss the opportunites to strengthen international collaboration in medicine quality and how to provide more high quality evidence. It will provide a unique opportunity for talented journalists to network with international experts and forge stronger connections between scientists, policy-makers and journalists.</p> <p>The deadline for applications is <strong>Sunday, 12 August 2018 at 23:59 (BST); </strong>the successful Fellowship applicants will be confirmed by late August 2018. <br />  </p> <h3><strong>Application process</strong></h3> <ul><li>Submission of 1 published piece of work with a focus on medicine quality issues or global health in any format (print, digital, audio or video), published since 1 January 2016.</li> <li>The article should be in English but translations will be accepted if the original article is also attached.</li> <li>An up-to-date CV</li> <li>A completed application form (enclosed below)</li> <li>A copy of your current passport photo page</li> </ul><p><em>Note: applications without one of these documents will not be considered</em></p> <p>Please submit your application (publication, CV, application form and current passport) to <a href="mailto:mqph2018%40ndm.ox.ac.uk">mqph2018@ndm.ox.ac.uk</a> with the title Global Health Journalism Fellowship application. </p> <p><strong>Selection criteria</strong></p> <ul><li>Applicants should be: <ul><li>Early career journalists with a maximum of 5 years of experience</li> <li>A national of a <a href="https://data.worldbank.org/income-level/low-and-middle-income" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">low- or middle-income country</a></li> <li>Able to demonstrate your interest in global health issues</li> <li>Able to demonstrate a commitment to balanced, accurate reporting through your submitted piece</li> <li>Available to attend the Conference between 23-28 September 2018 in Oxford, UK</li> </ul></li> </ul><p><em>Note: We strongly advise journalists to check with the relevant UK embassy about the visa application process in advance and confirm they can acquire a visa within four-weeks, if successful.</em> <br />  </p> <h3><strong>Benefits</strong></h3> <ul><li>Selected journalists will receive a bespoke briefing from communications experts and world-leading scientists at the Universit of Oxford</li> <li>The Conference provides a unique opportunity for networking with global health experts and other journalists interested in medicine quality and related issues</li> <li>Support for interview requests and access to speakers will be provided</li> <li>A certificate of participation will be provided after the Conference</li> <li>The fellowship will cover the costs for <ul><li>Flights from the country of residency to the UK</li> <li>A standard visitor visa for travel to the UK</li> <li>Registration for 5 days at the Medicine Quality and Public Health conference</li> <li>5 days accommodation and meals at the conference venue</li> </ul></li> </ul><p><br /><a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/journalism-fellowship/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Find out more about MQPH 2018</a> and download the application form <a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/journalism-fellowship/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> <div class="field--comments"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-lg-12"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=316&amp;2=field_comments&amp;3=comment" token="yBXVFoPMLdsS_MHlV-h8R9TiaXpcWZ17swP4aBfmoVs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 03 Aug 2018 09:24:54 +0000 bradley.smith 316 at https://www.iddo.org Experts to seek consensus on tackling poor quality medicines https://www.iddo.org/news/experts-seek-consensus-tackling-poor-quality-medicines <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Experts to seek consensus on tackling poor quality medicines </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">31 May 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A pioneering conference will bring leading professionals from all over the world to Oxford, UK to discuss strategies for tackling poor quality medical products on a global scale.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/World%20Map.png?itok=bTx552GN" width="600" height="300" alt="Credit: United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP)" title="Credit: United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The proliferation of poor quality medical products (medicines, vaccines and devices) is an important but neglected public health problem, threatening millions of people all over the world, both in developing and wealthy countries. A recent report from the World Health Organization found that an estimated <a href="https://www.iddo.org/news/news-articles/WHO-medical-products-publications" rel="nofollow" target="_self">1 in 10 medicines</a> in low- and middle-income countries were falsified or substandard. Falsified diazepam found across Scotland has been reported as being “cheaper than chips”.</p> <p>Falsified and substandard medicines, which may have the incorrect or wrong dose of pharmaceutical ingredients, or no active ingredients at all, may result in death, prolonged illness, side effects or loss of trust in healthcare systems; for antimicrobials they are also likely to be a key driver of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).</p> <p>“Our ability to tackle the issue is hampered by its complexity,” said Prof Paul Newton, Head of the <a href="https://www.iddo.org/medicine-quality" rel="nofollow" target="_self">Medicine Quality Group at the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) </a>and the instigator of the conference. “Criminals are becoming more sophisticated, using the internet as well as offline pharmacies for distribution, creating falsified medicines and working across geographical boundaries and in countries with varying legislation and levels of enforcement. Errors in factories without sufficient quality control results in substandard medicines, often containing insufficient ingredients, that because they look genuine are hard to detect.</p> <p>“The issue affects a broad range of stakeholders from individual patients, pharmacists and medicine regulatory authorities to the pharmaceutical industry and law enforcement agencies. We need to better understand the scale of the problem, raise awareness and encourage interventions and support so that every country has a functional medicine regulatory agency to ensure that we all have access to medicines we can trust ,” said Prof Newton.</p> <p>“The conference will be an important opportunity for the diverse stakeholders involved in medicine quality and regulation to come together within the framework of a dedicated academic conference to share ideas and expertise. One of the event’s key objectives is to develop a consensus statement to be widely disseminated to interested parties and policy-makers, forming the basis of a coordinated global effort to tackle poor quality medical products.”</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Medicine Quality &amp; Public Health Conference</a> (MQPH2018) will provide a unique opportunity for medicines regulatory authorities, health workers, scientists, pharmacists, sociologists, economists and international organisations to discuss the problem and outline the necessary steps to address this important issue.</p> <p>The Conference is expected to attract leading authorities from all over the world, including representatives from a diversity of organisations in low- and middle-income countries, where the issue of poor quality medicines is often more pronounced due to inadequate surveillance systems.</p> <p>More information about the speakers can be found on the conference <a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/speakers-2/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">website</a>.</p> <p>The Medicine Quality &amp; Public Health Conference will take place at Keble College, Oxford from 23-28 September 2018. If you are interested in attending the conference or would like to find out more, please visit the conference <a href="http://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/about/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">website</a> or email <a href="mailto:mqph2018%40ndm.ox.ac.uk">mqph2018@ndm.ox.ac.uk</a>. </p> <p>Join our discussion on Twitter #MQPH2018 </p> <p>The deadline for submitting abstracts is <strong>18 June 2018.</strong></p> <p>The deadline for registration is <strong>31 August 2018.</strong></p> <p>A limited number of <strong>early bird places</strong> are available on a first come, first served basis.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Editor’s notes</strong><strong> </strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.tropicalmedicine.ox.ac.uk/medicinequality2018/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>The Medicine Quality &amp; Public Health Conference</strong></a> is being organised by the Centre for Tropical Medicine &amp; Global Health at the University of Oxford, the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory and the <a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/home" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit</a>. </p> <p><a href="https://www.iddo.org/medicine-quality" rel="nofollow"><strong>IDDO’s Medicine Quality Group</strong></a> encourages discussion of poor quality medicine epidemiology, detection and prevention, and aims to facilitate improvement in the quality of medicines that patients take. IDDO facilitates the sharing of data and expertise and collation of information to increase understanding of the prevalence and distribution of poor quality medicines around the world. </p> <p><a href="https://www.iddo.org/news/news-articles/new-terminology" rel="nofollow" target="_self">Definitions of<strong> falsified and substandard medicines </strong></a>were agreed by the World Health Organization in May 2017. The definitions are: “Substandard” medical products (also called “out of specification”) are authorized by national regulatory authorities, but fail to meet either national or international quality standards or specifications – or in some cases, both. “Falsified” medical products deliberately or fraudulently misrepresent their identity, composition or source. </p> <p>For further information or interviews, please contact Jing Xu <a href="mailto:jing.xu%40iddo.org">jing.xu@iddo.org</a> or Anne Whitehouse <a href="mailto:anne.whitehouse%40iddo.org">anne.whitehouse@iddo.org</a> +44(0) 1865 612948.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Thu, 31 May 2018 16:01:11 +0000 bradley.smith 272 at https://www.iddo.org Study analyses AMR networks in low- and middle-income countries https://www.iddo.org/news/study-analyses-amr-networks-low-and-middle-income-countries <div class="iddo-page-wrapper row full-width"> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-introduction-area"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-8"> <div class="field field--name-node-title field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item"><h1> Study analyses AMR networks in low- and middle-income countries </h1> </div> <div class="news-type-and-date"> <div class="field field--name-node-post-date field--type-ds field--label-hidden field--item">05 Mar 2018</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-introduction field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A new study published today reveals the challenges of establishing sustainable and effective networks to tackle resistance to antimicrobial medicines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-4"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/styles/standard_image_crop/public/news/Credit%20IDDO%20Mehul%20Dhorda.jpg?h=54380a9a&amp;itok=FQby5CtJ" width="480" height="300" alt="IDDO/ Mehul Dhorda" title="Credit: IDDO/ Mehul Dhorda" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-sm-12 full-width-gutter content-bottom"><div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-8 col-md-9"> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The study, ‘<a href="https://academic.oup.com/jac/advance-article/doi/10.1093/jac/dky026/4921008" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy">An inventory of supranational antimicrobial resistance surveillance networks involving low- and middle-income countries since 2000</a>’, points out that strong leadership and sustained investment are essential to overcome the challenges.</p> <p>LMICs shoulder the bulk of the global burden of infectious diseases and drug resistance, and whilst awareness of the threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is growing, LMICs often have weaker surveillance systems and fewer resources to tackle the problem. </p> <p>The study provides an analysis of supranational AMR surveillance networks involving LMICs that were in existence between January 2000 and August 2017. It assesses the impact and challenges of these networks and the implications for the <a href="http://www.who.int/glass/en/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System">Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (GLASS)</a>. 72 AMR supranational networks were identified, but over half of them have already collapsed due to a variety of challenges, including the inability to secure ongoing funding.</p> <p>An effective surveillance system is the cornerstone of assessing the burden of AMR and for providing the necessary information for action. The biggest challenges faced by the global networks were achieving high coverage across LMICs and complying with the recommended frequency of reporting.</p> <p>In 2015, the 68th World Health Assembly adopted a <a href="http://www.who.int/antimicrobial-resistance/publications/global-action-plan/en/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance</a> and the <a href="http://www.who.int/glass/en/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System">GLASS</a> was established to support the implementation of one of the Plan’s five strategic objectives - to strengthen the evidence base through enhanced global surveillance and research.</p> <p>GLASS aims to build up passive surveillance of antibacterial resistance integrated into routine case-management of patients, replacing the current monitoring methods for HIV, TB and malaria drug resistance, which usually rely on active surveillance efforts such as cross-sectional surveys or observational studies at sentinel sites.</p> <p>However, lack of resources, low coverage and un-standardised surveillance activities in LMICs could challenge this global initiative. “Our analysis suggests that complementary active approaches may be needed in many LMICs. Antimicrobial resistance surveillance requires a level of laboratory infrastructure and training which is not always available,” said Dr Elizabeth Ashley, lead author of the study and Clinical Researcher at the <a href="http://www.tropmedres.ac/mocru-myanmar" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Myanmar-Oxford Clinical Research Unit</a>, University of Oxford.</p> <p>The study suggests that a successful AMR surveillance network should be able to generate up-to-date comparable, representative, high-quality data. However, the networks identified were initiated by a variety of different organisations, including the World Health Organization, the pharmaceutical industry, and academic groups, resulting in a diversity of approaches. For example, academic networks tend to focus AMR surveillance around one specific clinical question while pharmaceutical companies had the objective of evaluating susceptibility to one specific drug.</p> <p>Despite the challenges, Dr Ashley remains optimistic: “Having a better understanding of the challenges is the first step towards solving them. It is a positive sign that the UK government along with international organisations have vowed to tackle this issue and made a significant investment in supporting efforts to understand and address AMR.”</p> <p>Ashley et al suggest that successful networks need strong leadership and coordination, and should influence policy and guidelines to have a positive impact on human and animal health. A ‘<a href="http://www.who.int/features/qa/one-health/en/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One Health</a>’ approach to surveillance would take into account the interaction between drivers of AMR in humans, animals and the environment, and an up-to-date registry of networks could support a more coordinated approach, reduce duplication of effort, and improve sustainability.</p> <p><strong>Publication details</strong><br /> Elizabeth A Ashley, Judith Recht, Arlene Chua, David Dance, Mehul Dhorda, Nigel V Thomas, Nisha Ranganathan, Paul Turner, Philippe J Guerin, Nicholas J White, Nicholas P Day; An inventory of supranational antimicrobial resistance surveillance networks involving low- and middle-income countries since 2000, <em>Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy</em>, dky026, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dky026" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dky026</a>. PMID: 29514279</p> <p>This publication is the result of an independent study commissioned by Wellcome and funded by the UK’s Department of Health.</p></div> </div> <div class="col-xs-12 col-sm-4 col-md-3"> </div> </div></div> <div class="col-sm-12 content-paragraphs"> </div> </div> Mon, 05 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +0000 bradley.smith 187 at https://www.iddo.org